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Military History Magazine




  • Military History Magazine

    Hallowed Ground | Khe Sanh, Vietnam

    For Americans involved in ground operations during the Vietnam War, combat had many faces. Search-and-clear missions through jungles or rice paddies were typical, but troops also engaged in conventional battles—the largest of which was...

  • Military History Magazine

    Valor | Romania’s Heroine

    Killed in action in September 1917 leading Romanian troops into battle, Ecaterina Teodoroiu was likely the first woman in the 20th century to command a male infantry unit in combat. Today she’s regarded as a national heroine, but during...

  • Military History, MH Issues

    September 2017 Table of Contents

    The September 2017 issue features a cover story about General Douglas MacArthur's role in the 1945 surrender of Japan...

  • Military History Magazine

    Kings of the Rubble

    Militants hoped the bombing of Iraq’s al-Askari shrine would inflame a sectarian civil war between the nation’s Sunni and Shiite Muslims—and they got their wish. Though bloodless, the Feb. 22, 2006, bombing of the al-Askari shrine in...

  • Military History Magazine

    The Glory of the Sun King

    Over his lengthy reign Louis XIV defeated successive generations of European royalty—but in so doing he sealed the fate of the absolute monarchy in France. London was still smoldering when France’s King Louis XIV proclaimed his...

  • Military History Magazine

    Great Scot at Waterloo

    George Drummond Graeme was the last man standing at La Haye Sainte farmhouse during the epic 1815 battle. Just off the N5 highway connecting the Belgian cities of Charleroi and Brussels stands La Haye Sainte, a privately owned farm complex...

  • Military History Magazine

    Reconquista

    When Ferdinand and Isabella retook Granada in 1492, they ended eight centuries of Muslim rule on the Iberian Peninsula. In Western minds 1492 resonates as the year Christopher Columbus arrived on the Atlantic and Caribbean shores of the...

  • Military History Magazine

    Payoff in Tokyo Bay

    In September 1945 General Douglas MacArthur commanded center stage aboard the battleship Missouri as Japan’s surrender ended World War II. At 7 p.m. on Tuesday, Aug. 14, 1945—days after atomic bombs incinerated the Japanese cities of...

  • Military History Magazine

    A True Warrior-King: Gustavus II Adolphus

    Gustavus II Adolphus, Sweden’s legendary ‘Lion of the North,’ was a master tactician, a fearsome frontline fighter and a successful nation builder. A 15th century prophecy averred that a series of disasters would end only when a...

  • Military History Magazine

    Society of the Cincinnati

    A fraternity of revolutionary officers—or a monarchist conspiracy? In May 1782, seven months after the British army’s surrender at Yorktown, Va., General George Washington was at his headquarters in a fieldstone farmhouse near...

  • Military History Magazine

    Facing the Tigers at Hill 112

    After D-Day, allied forces seeking to outflank the German-held city of Caen ran into a wall of steel at Hill 112. Crossing the narrow Odon was the first crucial objective in Operation Epsom, Allied ground commander Field Marshal Sir...

  • Military History Magazine

    Edward III at Crécy

    The Hundred Years’ War (1337–1453) was a dynastic struggle between France and England that laid the foundations of national consciousness in both countries. It was also a drawn-out slogging match, with major battles few and far...

  • Military History Magazine

    What We Learned from the Battle of Shiloh

    The Battle of Shiloh, fought in middle Tennessee on April 6 and 7, 1862, was the bloodiest in North American history to that time, forcing both Southerners and Northerners to recognize the true ferocity of the year-old Civil War. The clash...

  • Military History Magazine

    Valor: Hanging By a Thread

    William Lowrey John McCants U.S. Navy Distinguished Flying Cross San Diego, California May 15, 1941 What the Navy would call “one of the most brilliant and daring rescues” in the history of the service occurred not in war but seven...

  • Military History Magazine

    Hallowed Ground: Monmouth, New Jersey

    On June 26, 1778, nine days into their march from Philadelphia to New York, Lt. Gen. Sir Henry Clinton and his beleaguered British army lumbered into a small New Jersey town called Monmouth Courthouse. Beset by torrential rains and...

  • Military History Magazine

    First Black Colonel: Charles Young

    Charles Young made a career of breaking down barriers in the segregated U.S. Army. Charles Young was born into slavery in a two-room log cabin in Mays Lick, Ky., on March 12, 1864. His father Gabriel later fled to freedom and in 1865...